Research

Philipps-Universität Marburg CUDA Research Center Summary

 

About the CUDA Research Center at the Philipps-Universität Marburg
Research at the Philipps-Universität Marburg has traditionally been centered around medicine, chemistry and biology. One of the first fields in computer science has been Graphics and Multimedia with strong interdisciplinary connections to these disciplines. Other important groups conduct fundamental research on Parallel Languages and Distributed Computing. The CUDA Research Center at Philipps-University Marburg is conducting research in the fields of Computer Graphics, Medical Imaging, Molecular Simulation, Numeric, and fundamentals of Parallel Programming.

About the co-PIs
Michael Guthe is an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Philipps-Universität Marburg and head of the Computer Graphics and Multimedia group. He received a M.Sc. in Computer Science from the University Tübingen in 2000 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University Bonn in 2005. He has held a postdoctoral research position at University Bonn prior to joining the Philipps-Universität Marburg in 2007. His research interests are in the areas of real-time rendering, 3D modelling, and global illumination. He extensively uses GPU computing for level-of-detail algorithms and interactive global illumination.

Birte Steiniger received her MD at Hannover Medical School and is professor of anatomy. She heads the Department of Immunobiology in the Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology of Marburg University. Her research is centered on elucidating the three-dimensional structure and cellular composition of human lymphatic organs and the human tooth pulp including their vasculature. In addition, she investigates the in-vivo distribution and the fate of cells belonging to the monocyte-macrophage system in rodents.

Guido Germano is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Philipps-Universität Marburg and head of the Computer Simulation group. He received a M.Sc. (1994) and a PhD (1998) in computational chemistry from the University of Pisa, and has been a postdoctoral research assistant in computational physics at the Universities of Bristol (until 2000) and of Bielefeld (until 2002). His research interests are in computational statistical mechanics, especially soft condensed matter theory and complex systems, using classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of liquids on massively parallel architectures, molecular graphics, and stochastic processes.

Ekaterina Kostina is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Philipps-Universität Marburg and head of the Numerical Optimization group. She received a M.Sc. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Minsk (Belarus) in 1986 and a Ph.D. in Mathematics and Physics from the Academy of Sciences of Belarus in 1990. She has held a research scientist position at the Institute of Mathematics of Academy of Sciences of Belarus (1986-1997), a postdoctoral position at IWR, University Heidelberg (1997-2002), and an assistant professorship at IWR University Heidelberg (2002-2007) prior to joining the Philipps-Universität Marburg. Her research interests are in the areas of theoretical analysis, design of algorithms, and software development for large scale optimization problems appearing in optimization of dynamic processes. She extensively uses GPU computing for optimal experimental design in the multiple-experiment case and for optimization under uncertainties.

Rita Loogen is leading the Parallelism and Programming Languages group in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Philipps-Universität Marburg. She received a diploma degree (M.Sc., 1985), doctoral degree (Ph.D., 1989) and habilitation degree (venia legendi, 1993) in Computer Science from the RWTH Aachen (Germany). Since 1993 she is university professor at Philipps-Universität Marburg. Her research interests are parallel declarative programming, especially language design and implementation, and programming methodology. Her group co-developed and implemented the parallel functional programming language Eden, a parallel Haskell extension.